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Dale and Appelbe’s Pharmacy and Medicines Law 10th Edition PDF

Dale and Appelbe’s Pharmacy and Medicines Law 10th Edition PDF Free Download

Dale and Appelbe's Pharmacy and Medicines Law 10th Edition PDF Free Download

E-BOOK DESCRIPTION
Development of the law in relation to pharmacy, medicines and poisons Before the middle of the 19th century, there were no legal restrictions in England on the sale of poisons or drugs, and anyone could describe themselves as a pharmaceutical chemist. Statutory control over sales was first applied to arsenic because, as the preamble to the Arsenic Act 1851 stated, the unrestricted sale of arsenic facilitates the commission of crime. The first statute relating to pharmacy followed the next year. The Pharmacy Act 1852 confirmed the charter of incorporation of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, which had been granted in 1843. The 1852 Act established the framework of the Society and gave it power to hold examinations and to issue certificates. It also restricted the use of the title pharmaceutical chemist to members of the Society, although it did not restrict the use of the titles chemist or druggist. The Society received its Royal prefix in 1988.

In 2010, the Society was wound up to be replaced by two bodies: the regulator, the General Pharmaceutical Council, and a new professional leadership body, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. This book focuses only on the first of these bodies. The Pharmacy Act 1868 brought new developments. It introduced a Poisons List (with 15 entries) and empowered the Society to add other substances to it, subject to the approval of the Privy Council. A poison was defined as any substance included in the Poisons List. Articles and preparations containing poisons could be sold by retail only by pharmaceutical chemists or by a new legal class of chemists and druggists. Both titles were protected by the Act. The class of chemists and druggists comprised (a) all those who before the passing of the Act had been engaged in the keeping of open shop for the compounding of the prescriptions of duly qualified medical practitioners, and (b) all those persons who had been registered as assistants under the provisions of the Pharmacy Act 1852. The Registrar of the Society was thereafter required to keep registers of pharmaceutical chemists, of chemists and druggists, and of apprentices or…

Dale and Appelbe’s Pharmacy and Medicines Law 10th Edition PDF Free Download, Dale and Appelbe’s Pharmacy and Medicines Law 10th Edition PDF Ebook Free